Revista
Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Education

Fecha de publicación
2022

ISBN
9780190264093

Páginas
1-20

Inclusive education as a human right

Ignacio Calderón-Almendros & Gerardo Echeita-Sarrionandia

 

Abstract

Inclusive education has been internationally recognized as a fundamental human right for all, without exception. This international recognition seeks to address the dramatic inequality in current societies, since the enjoyment of the right to education for many disadvantaged people depends on it being inclusive. The recognition and enjoyment of this right requires a detailed analysis of the meaning and scope of inclusive education, as well as of the barriers and the main challenges faced.

The consideration of inclusive education as a right, with its moral and legal implications, has been achieved to a large extent thanks to the political impact of diverse association movements of people with (dis)abilities. Paradoxically, many students with disabilities continue to be systematically segregated into special schools and classrooms, which violates their right to inclusive education. There is therefore much to learn from this contradiction. A lot also needs to be done to ensure the equal dignity and rights of people that experience exclusion and segregation associated with gender, social class, sexual orientation, nationality, ethnicity, ability, etc.

To this end, it is important to conceptually delimit the neoliberal domestication of a profoundly transformative term. The historical evolution of the recognition of inclusive education as a human right needs to be understood. There is also a need to consider the strength of the scientific evidence supporting it in order to counter certain views that question its relevance, despite them having been soundly refuted. Untangling these knots enables a more situated and realistic analysis to address some of the problems to be tackled in the implementation of inclusive education. This is a social and political endeavor that must break away from the market-oriented logic in education systems. It involves accepting that it is a fundamental right to be guaranteed through collective responsibility.

Article contents

1. Educating in Unequal Societies
2. Delimiting Inclusive Education
3. The Struggle to See Inclusive Education Recognized as a Human Right
4. The Benefits of Inclusive Education According to International Research
5. Resistance in Real-Life Practices
6. Inclusive Education, Human Rights, and the Transformation of Schools
7. Further Reading
8. References

> In the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Education website

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